Tag Archives: 18th Century

Not Chelsea

Not Chelsea, Selection of Fine Treen

Not Chelsea will be exhibiting a mixture of fine treen including, boxes, ink stands and snuff boxes, nutmeg graters, dresser stools and goblets.

Ian Milbourne will be exhibiting at the Rose Antiques Fairs York Racecourse Antiques Fair on the 8 – 9 June 2018.

For further information about stock items and an informal discussion please phone Ian Milbourne at 01430 432329.

Malcolm Eglin Antiques

Malcolm Eglin Antiques is a friendly Northumbrian dealership specialising in decorative antiques, fine art and period 17th, 18th and 19th century furnishings perfect for interior design.

Malcolm Eglin Antiques, dealer in fine antique furniture, furnishings, paintings and lighting

Malcolm Eglin Antiques is based just North of Bywell, Near Stocksfield, Northumberland, NE43 7AQ.

Malcolm Eglin  Antiques will be exhibiting at the Rose Antiques Fairs York Racecourse Antiques Fair on the 8th and 9th June 2018.

For further information or to view, buy or pre-order any of the antiques below, e-mail Malcolm Eglin Antiques at malcolm@malcolmeglinantiques.com  or pat@malcolmeglinantiques.com Alternatively, for an informal chat about stock items, call Malcolm Eglin Antiques on 01434 609609 or 07966 398123.

Karen Bradley

18 carat gold cabriolet duplex 8 day watch. Extraordinary twin cased cabriolet watch with an 8 day duplex movement. Slight damage to dial at position 6. Dial and movement signed Mather & Brother London. Very rare. Code 1810. £5500

Karen Bradley deals in a range of fine silver and jewellery, particularly specialising in rare and very beautiful pocket watches inluding examples made by Auguste L’Epée (1798-1875), Patek Philippe and Vacheron & Constantin to name but a few

Karen Bradley will be exhibiting at the Rose Antiques Fairs York Racecourse Antiques Fair on the 8 – 9 June 2018.

To reserve or buy any item on this page E-mail info@antiquekaren.co.uk or for an informal chat call Karen Bradley at 07885 732193 You can also visit her web site at https://www.antiquekaren.co.uk

TSV Antiques

19th century Moser Harrach Wine and Hock Set. Decorated with a green flash to the top, gold and platinum enameling in a classic stylised leaf form and are set with glass “jewels” The wine glasses extend from a gilt-edged foot to a stubby stem and then to a generous bowl, while the goblets stand taller, with hollow ridged stems. 14 and 18cm high

Barbara and Ian of TSV Antiques have well over 20 years experience in the antiques trade. They are based in Hampshire and deal in a range of high quality antiques including jewellery, objets-de-virtu, silver, scent bottles, decanters, snuff boxes, ceramics, costume jewellery, glass, bronzes, lighting and practical home-wares.

TSV Antiques will be exhibiting at the York Racecourse Antiques Decorative and Fine Art Fair on the 8th 9th June 2018.

For further information about stock visit, TSV Antiques at https://tsvantiques.co.uk/welcome-to-tsv-antiques/ or email TSV Antiques at info@tsvantiques.co.uk.

Sylvie Collett

Early to Mid 19th Century Palais Royal Sewing Box

For 20 years Sylvie Collett has been dealing in antique needlework tools from the 18th to early 20th centuries, including etuis, pincushions, thimbles and work boxes.  Sylvie Collett also sell scent bottles, snuff boxes, silver, glass, treen and other interesting items.

In addition to exhibiting at various fairs throughout the country, a selection of Sylvie Collett’s stock may be seen at Hemswell Antiques Centre near Gainsborough, Lincolnshire and at Drill Hall Antiques Centre in Horncastle.

Sylvie Collett Specialising in 18th Century, 19th Century, 20th Century, Antique Needlework Tools

Sylvie Collett will be exhibiting at the York Racecourse Antiques Decorative and Fine Art Fair on the 8th 9th June 2018.

For further information about Sylvie Collett’s stock visit her website at http://sewantiques.com/index.php or e-mail sylvie@sewantiques.com for further information about specific items.

village gallery

village gallery, 14 Colliergate, York

At village gallery in Colliergate York, we like to mix old with new … antique silver alongside the work of contemporary silversmiths, old jewellery alongside newly designed pieces, and so on.

We have a particular passion for Lalique glass and have extensive stocks from original René Lalique pieces as early as c1914, right up to brand new straight from the factory.

On the art side we host a regularly changing programme of exhibitions of (predominantly) local artists, sculptors and craft work. Amongst others we are currently featuring the work of artist and illustrator Simon Wilcox, batik artist Rebecca Mason, British renowned sculptor Edward Waites and award winning wood turner Ralph Shuttleworth.

We will be exhibiting a collection of works of art by local artists on the first floor mezzanine at the Rose Antiques Fairs York Racecourse Antiques Decorative and Fine Art Fair on the 8-9 June 2018.

For further information about village gallery in York visit them at 14 Colliergate York YO1 8BP, we are open 10-17:00 Tuesday to Saturday. Alternatively call them on 01904 411 444 or visit our web page www.village-on-the-web.com

Twitter: @villageontheweb     Facebook: @villagegalleryyork    Instagram: @villageontheweb

Julia Drinkhall Antiques & Interiors

Early 19th Century Gillows Mahogany 5 Drawer Desk/Dressing Table Date C.1810

Julia Drinkhall Antiques & Interiors is based in Dark Island, Rait Antiques Centre,
Perthshire, Scotland and stocks a superb selection of fine antique furniture, silver and other beautiful and interesting decorative antiques.

Julia Drinkhall Antiques & Interiors will be exhibiting at the Rose Antiques Fairs York Racecourse Antiques Fair on the 8th and 9th June 2018.

For further information or to view, buy or pre-order any of the antiques below, e-mail Julia Drinkhall Antiques & Interiors at julia.drinkhall@btinternet.com  or alternatively, for an informal chat about stock items, call Julia Drinkhall Antiques & Interiors on 07703678515, Tel: 01821 670499. To view more stock from Julia Drinkhall Antiques visit her Antiques Atlas shop https://www.antiques-atlas.com/antiqueseastredstone/.

Bryan Bowden

Bryan Bowden dealer in fine antique 18th century to 20th century ceramics

Dealer in 18th, 19th and early 20th century ceramics, small furniture including one of the best collections of Rockingham Porcelain in the North of England. This year Bryan will also be exhibiting a collection of fine Royal Worcester porcelain including a number of signed pieces decorated by J Stinton.

Bryan Bowden will be exhibiting at the Rose Antiques Fairs York Racecourse Antiques Decorative and Fine Art Fair on the 8-9 June 2018.

For further information about any of the items displayed on this page, e-mail Bryan Bowden at enquiries@bryanbowdenantiques.co.uk

La Brocante

La Brocante, Montpellier Mews Antiques Market, Harrogate, dealer in fine French antique furniture and furnishings along with French and English prints

La Brocante, Montpellier Mews Antiques Market, Harrogate, dealer in fine French antique glass, furniture, and furnishings along with French and English prints

La Brocante

La Brocante is based in Montpellier Mews Antique Market, Montpellier Street in Harrogate and deals in fine antique French glass, French furniture and French/English antique prints.

La Brocante will be exhibiting at the Rose Antiques Fairs York Racecourse Antiques Fair on the 8 and 9 June 2018.

For further information and to reserve or buy any of the Antique furniture, furnishings or prints on this page e-mail john.sherriff@virginmedia.com. For an informal chat with John Sherriff  about his stock items call him on  07941985726.

Tea Drinking And The Origins of English Porcelain Manufacture

The history of tea drinking in England begins with Portuguese traders importing tea to Portugal. The exotic oriental nature of this new drink, along with its high price, soon brought it to the attention of the Portuguese Royal Court, where tea became highly fashionable. Samual Pepys diary records that small amounts of tea were being imported into England by 1660, but tea didn’t acquire popularity. It took the Restoration of the Monarchy and the marriage of Charles II to the Portuguese princess Catherine of Braganza in 1662 before tea gained favour in England. Catherine had been brought up with tea in the Portuguese court and brought the tea drinking habit with her to the English court. Very soon tea became fashionable at court from where tea drinking spread to the aristocracy. This led to the East India Company, founded in 1600, making its first order of 100lbs of China tea from Java in 1664. Throughout the rest of the 17th century the amounts of tea shipped into Britain by the East India Tea Company steadily increased, but tea really took off as a popular drink in the 18th century, such that by 1750 the East India Company was shipping in just under 5 million pounds of tea.

During the early to mid 18th century, the East India Trading Company shipped tea along with other goods from China to England. One of the problems with the shipping of perishable commodities from China to England was the length of the voyage. The return trip could take up to 22 months and sea water could get into the holds. In order to use this space profitably, the East India Company and its officers, who traded privately, began to buy inexpensively manufactured Chinese porcelain teaware from dealers in Canton. As the teaware was sea water resistant, it could be used as ballast by packing it into the lower, leaky parts of the hold. The teaware could then be sold at 3-4 times the price paid on arrival in England. The availability of teaware further promoted tea drinking and the sale of tea.

Most of the Chinese porcelain imported by the East India Company was landed at the company wharf at London Bridge and sold via East India House in Leadenhall Street to a group of English merchants referred to as the London Chinamen. This had the effect of centralising the supply of teaware and Chinese porcelain in London.

Chinese porcelain was quite different to English and continental earthenware based ceramics. The Chinese porcelain was hard, glass-like and could withstand large changes in temperature, making it the perfect choice forFigure 1 New Hall Boy With The Butterfly Patterned Tea Bowl and Saucer C1790 tea drinkers. European pottery makers recognised the value of Chinese porcelain and strove to emulate it. In Europe, this was first achieved at Meissen near Dresden in 1709 by the development of a feldspar based paste supplemented with kaolin, fired at high temperatures. The English pottery manufacturers came up with an alternative, so called soft paste porcelain, formed from a combination of clay and frit (ground quartz) fired at lower temperatures than hard paste porcelain. One of the earliest manufacturers of soft paste porcelain was Bow circa 1749. Such was the value of the Bow paste, which incorporated bone ash, that it was said Robert Brown, the founder of Lowestoft, hid in a barrel at the Bow works to watch the mixing of the paste.

Figure 2 Worcester Tea Canister Circa 1770The development of English soft paste porcelains by Bow, Lowestoft, Chelsea, Derby and Worcester, and the later production of hard paste porcelains by New Hall and Keeling allowed English pottery makers to emulate the Chinese porcelains styles/patterns (Figures 1) or Europeanised Chinese styles (Figure 2) by producing tea wares of comparable translucency and quality. This rise in good quality English tea wares combined with an ever increasing import duty on Chinese porcelain, made the continued trade in Chinese tea wares unviable. This resulted in the East India Company ceasing its trade in imported Chinese porcelain in 1798, which left the English tea ware market to the English ceramics manufacturers.